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Breaking the Bondage of Racial Barriers

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It’s no secret beloveds. The state of racism in the world can be seen in any country, on every media…especially social media! It’s almost impossible to exist while being black (African-American, African, Afro-Caribbean, etc) in the wake of all the recent killings, and not be effected by the ugliness that is happening more frequently. This modern day prey, created a system with a goal to kill, destroy and steal – livelihoods, dignity, opportunities, and identities of all that it sets it hooks into. There is a great blanket of deception, hanging high above the world. It targets minds – leaving victims believing the world is simply black and white. How many are awakened to the shades of gray which exists in between?

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People of color experience higher instances of profiling. We are told to behave in a manner which wouldn’t attract retaliatory consequences…basically, don’t piss off our oppressors! Oneika the Traveler believes that traveling while black is indeed a phenomenon. She’s even dedicated an entire section of her blog exposing and highlighting it.

2 Corinthians 10: 4-5 tells us that:

our weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but are mighty through God, to the pulling down of satanic strongholds.”

Beloveds, what this means is that we are NOT supposed to fight with other people, but rather, the invisible powers…spirits of hatred, fear, pride, deceptions, division…who’s mission is to divide and conquer. Black men and women can be seen being massively oppressed on a global scale, that we cannot point fingers at just America. When it comes to the industry of travel, we are left out of opportunities – especially in the media. We are in low numbers. However, we travel just as much as other races, if not more! We have been known for our trendiness in music, fashion and beauty. But we are appropriated at every angle, then ridiculed for being flawlessly creative.

How This Relates to Travel

There is such a thing called First-World vs. Third-World privilege (Black with Western Privilege). People might argue that being black has it’s privileges anywhere outside of the United States. I know I personally felt like a queen when I ventured to Tijuana, Mexico! I’ve had girlfriends tell me about their royal treatment when visiting other countries. I have also been told how beautiful my locs are, yet I do get stereotyped and/or judged more harshly than my perm wearing, weave-adorning sisters. When my head is wrapped, I am asked if I am muslim or from Jamaica. It can never just be…I feel more comfy with my head scarf, rather than leaving my locs untwisted in a huge poofy mat. For me, wearing locs and a dashiki might be trendy, but for some…its their cultural way of life! 13517430_813598412126638_4502220643934235995_o

Travel is intriguing. It has exposed so many to great accomplishments. For me, its rather therapeutic. It allows us to experience other cultures, tapping into our senses…to see, touch, smell, hear and taste all of the splendor which took God 6 days to create. It should’t matter what color our skin is. What defines us is our hearts and our mentality. And last time I checked, we are pretty much similar when it comes to our insides!

Sapphire Kharyzma
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Sapphire Kharyzma

Blogger-in-Chic, Travelpreneur at Queens of Virtue
Travel. Beauty. Style. engages women through an empowered life of Luxury Travel. Leisure and Life of Style. We seek real affluent minded women, to offer real, mind, body soul'U'tions, as we are transformed into queens through storytelling and capturing memories with Virtuous Journeys.

Travel is our lifestyle; our luxury tribe - where we come together as one collective, united and driven by the desire to experience the best of the best, rooted in the freedom of possibilities - abundantly available through luxury travel, with beauty, as our canvas, and style as our artistic tool.

Join us as we explore and get culturally inspired. Travel. Beauty. Style. is our luxury gateway. Blog features focus on experiencing diverse cultures through the life of luxury, uniquely and creatively. Gather your bucket lists, cameras, journals, passports, chic outfits, trendy beauty must-haves and tastebuds...sit back and relax, as queens don't catch feelings, we catch flights, trains, and ships - in beautiful style!
Sapphire Kharyzma
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Travel. Beauty. Style. engages women through an empowered life of Luxury Travel. Leisure and Life of Style. We seek real affluent minded women, to offer real, mind, body soul’U’tions, as we are transformed into queens through storytelling and capturing memories with Virtuous Journeys.

Travel is our lifestyle; our luxury tribe – where we come together as one collective, united and driven by the desire to experience the best of the best, rooted in the freedom of possibilities – abundantly available through luxury travel, with beauty, as our canvas, and style as our artistic tool.

Join us as we explore and get culturally inspired. Travel. Beauty. Style. is our luxury gateway. Blog features focus on experiencing diverse cultures through the life of luxury, uniquely and creatively. Gather your bucket lists, cameras, journals, passports, chic outfits, trendy beauty must-haves and tastebuds…sit back and relax, as queens don’t catch feelings, we catch flights, trains, and ships – in beautiful style!

  • Robin Rue

    I truly hope we see the day where EVERYONE is treated equally. It’s sad that this day in age we all can’t just realize that we’re all humans.

  • Alli Smith

    My prayer that is that someday all people will look past the color of skin and see the person on the inside. We are all created equal and it takes us all working together to get people to see that and stop the racial profiling!

  • Anecia

    Loved reading this.

  • I was raised to love everyone, and this is how I’m raising my kids as well.

  • Tomi_C

    Travel and exposure to various cultures is important. I really appreciate my parents exposing my siblings and I to travel at an early age and it’s something I’m glad to share with my kids. My motto is: Go forth and explore.

  • Broke Black Bougie

    Anti-Blackness is real and it’s global. One would think travelling would be a freeing experience! Although freeing it doesn’t prevent us from encountering global systemic issues of racism.

  • Candy Kage

    There are countries where gays and lesbians can not travel at all because they would be killed. I have been spit on and denied service in different countries and I am white. Racism effects everyone and is wrong no matter what.

  • blackgirlzen

    Every country has its own issues. I came from a third world country and we face many challenges. Great insights!
    BlackgirlZen

  • It sucks traveling sometimes. When I went to Iceland, only black guy in the group. When I went to India, only black guy in eye’s sight. Guess what, I enjoyed myself though. So I just move like I need to to make sure my sanity and safety are intact. There will be more travel adventures in the future, interesting to see if the world has evolved with each trip.

  • valmg

    I believe people should be treated based on how they behave and treat others, not on the color of their skin. There are many types of bias and discrimination and color is just one.

  • Jeanette

    I think travel is extremely important. I think more people should do it. I also think that if more people would travel we can understand other peoples backgrounds and where they’re coming from. The more we learn about somebody else the closer we become.

  • Paula Bendfeldt-Diaz

    I love Oneika and read her blog a lot. It is sad but there is a lot of prejudice out there when it comes to skin color and where you come from and this can also affect the experiences you have when you travel.

  • Sharon Koenig

    Apparently, I live in a bubble. I really had no idea these issues were going on. I don’t travel much so I wouldn’t know how people are treated one way or another. I assume we live in an age where there is love and tolerance world wide. This is good information for people of color so they can make an informed decision. Frankly, I wouldn’t want to travel to a place that I wasn’t welcome. It seems like it would take away from a joyful visit.

  • I can’t in any conscience say I understand how this feels, as I am fully aware of my white privilege. But I feel for you. I feel for you so emphatically and I’m strongly outspoken for equality and awareness. I’m sickened by the way racism still takes such a heavy hand in today’s society-I keep thinking “It’s 2017, how are we not further along as a species than this?!?!” I’m dumbfounded. I’m glad you’re opening writing about this and sharing your experiences, it helps people see things more clearly and get a different view on it.

  • Marysa

    It is tough knowing how much prejudice is out there. Travel is such an enriching experience, I hope that while she may have experienced racism, it didn’t slow her down.

  • It amazes me that there is so much racial discrimination still out there in the world, it makes me so sad as well, as we shouldn’t use that as a way to decide how to treat people, we are all equal.

  • I’ve been fortunate to not experience this while traveling abroad, but I hate knowing that it exists.

  • Pam W

    I have not personally experienced this, but I’m aware of how big of a problem racism and prejudice can be. Traveling is already stressful and being profiled would make it so much worse.

  • Victoria Alicia

    As someone with dual nationality, of one very advanced country and another in development, I have seen how one has more opened doors for me to visit countries that the other doesn’t. And yes, as a WOC, I have also been on the receiving end of different treatments based on the country I’m in.

  • Censie ‘Mumby’ Sawyer

    People love to say racism is dead but frankly they are blind if they believe that. It is really sad and I am so sorry you have experienced this while traveling. Traveling and vacation are supposed to be fun and carefree. Thank you for being open and discussing your experiences.

  • It’s so heartbreaking that discrimination to this extent is still so rampant nowadays. It’s so important to raise awareness and hopefully change those stereotypes!

  • Paris is one of my favorite cities and I have been going there for 20 year.s I have always been surprised at how nice the high end stores are when I just want to shop and not necessarily want to buy. I think they pretty much know that even though my french is passable they know I am American and therefore I want to buy. The flip side is I would never go to those same stores in the US because I know I would not be treated so nicely.

  • Melanie E

    It is such a shame that there is so much division in our country. I do not travel much, especially outside of the United States. So I had no idea how differently things are perceived in other places.

  • Claudia Krusch

    It is so sad there is so much hate in our world. We are all humans and need to see past the color of our skin.

  • Gemille Sleweon

    What a great read! As a black woman I can fully relate to the prejudice and racism faces on a daily basis. As a traveler, I can relate even more. We often look at the problems in our own backyard and forget that the things we face may follow us wherever we go. Thank you for such a relatable post!

  • Nicole Cochingco Escat

    It is today’s norm but we need to break it. We must open our minds that skin color nor the nation where we came is never the issue. We are all human.

  • Ave T

    This post really makes me thingk! I love traveling and as you say our travel experience should not be determined by our skin color.

  • I hate it when I get asked in the USA where I’m from…I’m f*cking from the USA dumb ass, do you not hear my perfect english???

  • I’ve had to take breaks from social media and all news outlets in general because of the way that I feel seeing POC treated the way that they are. And if you’re not a POC and supportive, then you get berated as well. You’re danged if you do, you’re danged if you don’t.

  • marciaf

    It’s become frightening to travel out of the country lately too because of the prejudice both religious and ethnic. I enjoyed reading your viewpoint.

  • Acasha | 4EverMcKenzie

    This was a great read!! I love the comparison, travel definitely relates especially with all the positivity you get from other countries as a black female, compared to the negativity received here at HOME! Smh

  • Anamika Ojha

    I feel sad and angry whenever I read issues related to racism. I just hope someday our world will become a better place to live in for everyone, free from the discrimination based on color, caste, region or nationality.

  • I love how you said that travel is therapeutic! I agree that there’s division in today’s world and I find it very sad. It’s my hope and prayer that going forward, we can learn to embrace other cultures and love everyone! I do know that God is always in control and his hand is over the world.

  • Great read for me. Travel really helps people out. It takes out the stress and negativity that we got around.

  • Ouu I like the way you said “modern day prey” it has such strong meaning, such a bold statement. You’re right about the shades of grey that still exist today. I feel for you, why does it matter where you come from and shouldn’t be identified or labeled based on how you style your hair.

  • Carissa

    I wish the United State embraced everyone like the other countries do. I have heard these stories about being treated as royalty in other countries too…what a shame we dont get that treatment here in our homeland!

  • Toni Wiggins-Sorzano

    Iran such a shame that here in America we make things so hard. You go to other countries and you are embraced and loved. Here not so much.

    Your photos are beautifully

  • Adriana

    It’s true that we’re very divided but I do think there’s things to fix it. This was a really great read – it goes to show just how much you can learn from traveling and exploring and seeing other cultures and how they live! It makes a huge difference in how we think, I think!

  • As someone who comes from a 3rd world country, I can only relate a bit to the struggles of traveling. It can’t be avoided but I think that’s the sad part. Anyhow, I have a feeling that things will change — slowly but surely!

  • Lena B

    So interesting – such a unique look from “the other” side. I do have to say that being Russian I look like as the next one person, but I can’t even tell you how travel was different for me when I lived back in the old country. I wasn’t allowed to live airport terminals. People wouldn’t sell food to me. And I am talking about first world countries

  • moxieeee

    Very interesting post. It’s amazing how POC are treated, but created most of the “norms.” Thank you for speaking about your travel experiences.

  • The US is so far behind the times it is sad. I will never understand why someone elses shine has to dim your light. That is the sum total of racisim in the US. Others feel like empowering black people snuffs out their light. NOBODY can stop my shine I don’t care what color, gender or sexual orientation. Live and let live.

  • Some people honestly don’t understand the negative travel experiences that people of color face. Alot of the time, especially when leaving the country there are prejudices. And it can be even worst when your a woman, black and american…. but I still love traveling. Sometimes you just have to teach people who are willing to listen or ignore them completely.

  • Terri Huggins

    Great piece. You hit the nail on the idea when you mentioned “don’t annoy the oppressor” I do feel as though we need to be vigilant of that no matter where we travel. The color of my skin already makes me standout. I don’t need to draw any more attention to myself.

  • Kasi Perkins

    This is a really great post with a lot of good info. I can’t exactly say I’ve been treated like royalty in other countries, but everyone has been really friendly everywhere I’ve been.

  • Kristin Kimble

    Its absolutely unfortunate the the way discrimination and racism has reared its ugly head, but you hit it with the scripture! We don’t fight the people, but the spirits! And the way my faith is set up, God is definitely in the business of winning those battles if we keep armored up! This was a beautiful post! I am headed to Dubai in November and excited to experience their culture! I can honestly say, when I went to Aruba this past winter, I did not feel like royalty and my friend and I had a conversation because it almost felt like we were less than.

  • Tiffany Heard

    I think my privilege comes from me being American and not black while traveling.

  • Thanks for sharing. With all the racial tension going on it makes me hesitant to visit certain places,but I won’t let that stop me.So far I haven’t had any issues while traveling.

  • I agree that the racial tension and violence is really scary and maddening. My son is only and has already been called the n-word AND been told he is the wrong color by CHILDREN. I am raising him to know that his skin is beautiful, but at some point we will have to have the talks about how he needs to behave in order to move even somewhat safely through this world as a black male. Right now, he is small and cute, but I know the world won’t always see him that way. And it may happen sooner than I care to admit because he is really tall for his age (he just turned 7, but is taller than some 10-year-olds).

    As far as travel – I love it and want to do more of it. International travel is the best. I’ve visited Trinidad and Tobago a few times and that is my favorite place. I’ve also visited a few other countries and islands during a cruise. I was surprised by the people in Central America. Especially Belize. Their culture is so vibrant! I haven’t had any issues while traveling, BUT I have heard of places where Black people are not recommended to travel – especially alone. That makes me sad.

  • Jonna

    I agree – we should be able to travel and explore without bias. I wish people would appreciate cultural differences more.

  • It’s not easy surviving in a world where you feel racism against you. I think that black communities and other races which face racism should love and support themselves to build their confidence and resist racism.

  • Swati

    Racisim is everywhere and can’t be ignored but yes Travel does help us understand culture and appreciate and respect others